MyWay in the media!

It has been a very exciting time for MyWay, our personal safety app. Yesterday it was featured twice on BBC Radio Berkshire. Many thanks to Bridgitte Tetteh for some great questions, and to Ish Aa – RUSU Welfare Officer at the University of Reading for sharing her concerns as a young woman – skip to 46m30 secs on BBC Sounds:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p0gqzw69

Today, Traecy and I are on BBC News – talking about how we turned Traecy’s idea into reality using an app and Internet of Things sensors:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-67545358

I am delighted that MyWay is getting some attention in the media. Our involvement in Reading’s Safer Streets Partnership has helped raise its profile, and hopefully the extra publicity will help more people use it to feel safer when they are out and about, especially now it is getting dark so early.

If you live in Reading then you can use MyWay for free with this link. Just remember to tap your browser menu and add it to your home page.

Digital bees for the UK’s Local Honey Man

Madalina is Thingitude’s new trainee. Last week she had her first visit to a collaborative project focused on using the Internet of Things (IoT) to help beekeepers monitor the health of their hives. Here is Madalina’s report on the day.

Introducing the Local Honey Man

Curtis Thompson was first introduced to Apiculture (professional beekeeping) by his uncle at the age of 15. Curtis was fascinated with one of natures wonders “raw honey” – and the many problems that bees can solve.

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Make Reading safer with the MyWay app

MyWay is a free app that has been helping women students to feel safer in Reading for the last two years.

This year we’ve made MyWay available to everyone who lives in Reading, thanks in part to funding from Reading’s Safer Streets partnership.

The story behind the MyWay App

MyWay was the idea of Traecy, a trainee loT consultant working at Thingitude. In 2019 Traecy surveyed 50 women students at the University of Reading and realised that the safety of women students was an important problem to tackle. She wanted to help women university students be better informed and to feel safer, especially if walking alone.

With funding from the Thames Valley LEP, we worked with a small group of women from the University of Reading to help design the app and learn what the most useful features would be. Common concerns were knowing which streets were poorly or well-lit, which ones had other people on walking them, and knowing where any current trouble was going on.

Making Towns safer

We have installed sensors on every street in the town centre to give us accurate live data on how busy the streets are, and which ones are best lit at night. Reading is a relatively safe town, but even here, the town centre had over 2,000 incidents of a violent or sexual nature reported to the police last year. It is very difficult for anyone to know precisely where trouble might happen, however, with the MyWay app you can easily report trouble, and see places that can be avoided.

In May 2023 Lead Councillor for Community Safety Karen Rowland was asked about MyWay for local TV:

Every town wants to make sure that everyone is safe and having a good time especially when they are enjoying local entertainment, bars and restaurants. MyWay gives people a way to help themselves and their friends feel safer and be better informed when they are out in town.

Want to know more about the MyWay app:

If you live in Reading you can find all the information about getting the app and its features on our Instagram account:

If you are located in another town, we’d love to show you how to help your town become safer for everybody. Please contact us now!

Hopes and Fears for 2023

Open.AI generated image using the prompt "Solar power and bad data in the style of Kandinski"

There are already enough self-congratulatory reviews of 2022, so instead I decided to share a few of my hopes and fears for the year ahead.

Hopes

MyWay

This year will see MyWay evolve from a niche university student-focused safety app into a broader personal safety app. We have secured some funding which will allow us to make MyWay available to everyone who lives, works, plays in Reading.

It means we can help more people feel less vulnerable when walking around town, particularly when they are on their own, and at night. It also means we need to make some changes to the app. We are continuing our emphasis on co-design with vulnerable groups, and will be working with younger students (16+) and refugees, to better understand their needs and concerns and see how we can best adapt the app to suit them.

We will also be sharing data on safety incidents with Thames Valley Police to provide extra information for their own operations. We expect to do this using the open data platform Urban Data Exchange, which we already use in other projects such as Reading Hydro.

Big and simple IoT deployments

The Things Conference in Amsterdam in September last year presented the first few “proper” large scale IoT deployments in the UK. Two notable examples were smart streetlights, and smart water meters.

2023 should see more full scale projects, driven by pressure to reduce costs around energy, to be greener, and to keep people safe from COVID, along with greater supply of microelectronics. I think we will see large-scale deployments in offices, schools, social housing and public transport. They will be uncomplicated and will actually deliver a good return.

This is great news for IoT as a whole, and will hopefully entice some of the bigger tech players to get involved.

R & D

We have a limited budget for speculative R&D ourselves, but two areas are too exciting to miss out on.

Firstly – using satellites to augment terrestrial networks. I had my first taste of this with the Lacuna Space dev kit in the last 3 months. It is a very exciting area, full of potential and this year will see more LoRaWAN-enabled satellites launched, which means we will be able to send messages via satellite more times a day.

This year we will be working on two speculative projects (one funded) that will make good use of this exciting technology.

Secondly – battery-free sensors are becoming a reality! Companies like Voltaic are designing amazing, small factor solar panels and supercapacitors that mean there is no longer a need for sensors to be powered by batteries. This is *very* good news indeed because it reduces running costs, waste, and environmental impact. I am hopeful we will be able to make use of this with future MyWay installations, and with our Local Government clients.

Fears

Two big things are playing on my mind going into 2023:

State of Local Government

Local Government are Thingitude’s biggest source of revenue, and we love working with them because we can see that our projects can ultimately improve quality of life for the people who live and work in the Authority’s region.

Vacant posts are a problem. Local Government knows that IoT is here to stay and that we need to transfer skills from IoT companies across to council teams, but teams are stretched very thin, covering vacant posts and trying to tackle the backlog of work that built up during the COVID pandemic. It means we’re kept busy maintaining and supporting IoT systems, but we would prefer to skill up council teams so this work could be done internally at a fraction of the cost.

Councils are always under financial pressure, but given the current circumstances it is likely that this year is going to be particularly tough. Local Govt’s capacity to support new technology projects and changing practices whilst delivering essential services is seriously limited. My hope is that a few projects where the benefit case is clear and compelling will receive the funding and staff time they need to be fully implemented. Courage!

Bad data-driven decision making

People are such magpies for facts and data that we’ll believe them whether they are true or not. This was curious in the age of the printing press, perplexing in the age of social media …and it is going to be downright dangerous in the age of IoT and AI.

Society has decided that “data-driven decisions” are the gold standard for decision making. This sounds very sensible, but the *huge and often mistaken* assumption is that the data is correct, that it is comprehensive, and that it is being interpreted correctly to arrive at the decision.

Organisations are too quick to hand off decision-making to AI and IoT systems, perhaps dazzled by the technology or the cost savings. Of greatest concern is when these systems are making decisions about people. We know it is already a problem:

How do we ensure that the data and technology makes good decisions for *every* body, and organisations using it aren’t introducing (more) system bias against groups or individuals? This will be at the forefront of my mind as we continue to work with these exciting technologies.

Woodbridge Tide Mill

The opportunity to mix *really* old technology with the latest IoT is the kind of project we love doing, not least because you get to hang spend time with other passionate geeks and often in beautiful locations.

Over the past few months we’ve been quietly working on just such a project, and this week Mike and I headed off to do the installation at Woodbridge Tide Mill, a working mill and museum located by the River Deben on the coastal fringe of Suffolk.

I was introduced to Ian at the mill by the Suffolk County Council team back in March. Suffolk has been deploying a LoRaWAN network across the county for the past few years. They use it themselves for things like monitoring meeting room occupancy and smart streetlights, and they also make it available to local businesses, community groups and other organisations in the region.

Woodbridge Tide Mill
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